Teaching plan for the course unit

 

 

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On 3 April 2020 and in agreement with the President of the Government of Catalonia, the Catalan Minister of Business and Knowledge and the rectors of the other Catalan universities, the Rector of the Universitat de Barcelona decided to suspend all second-semester face-to-face teaching activities until the end of the academic year. For this reason, our university's teaching staff may need to make certain changes to the course plans of the subjects they teach, so that they can teach subjects online. When and where such changes are made, they will be explained in a new appendix attached to the end of the original course plan.



General information

 

Course unit name: Doing Business in Asia

Course unit code: 573476

Academic year: 2019-2020

Coordinator: Maria Angeles Pelegrin Sole

Department: Department of Economics

Credits: 2,5

Single program: S

 

 

Estimated learning time

Total number of hours 62.5

 

Face-to-face and/or online activities

25.5

 

-  Lecture

Face-to-face

 

13.5

 

-  Lecture with practical component

Face-to-face

 

4.5

 

-  Group tutorial

Face-to-face

 

1.5

 

-  Problem-solving class

Face-to-face

 

1.5

 

-  Practical exercises

Face-to-face

 

4.5

Supervised project

15

Independent learning

22

 

 

Competences to be gained during study

 

Basic and general competences

CG1. Creative and entrepreneurial skills (capacity to conceive, design and manage projects, and to research and integrate new knowledge and approaches).

CG2. Capacity to propose a business project based on an original idea and to assess its feasibility.

CB6. Knowledge forming the basis of original thinking in the development or application of ideas, typically in a research context.

CB7. Capacity to apply the acquired knowledge to problem-solving in new or relatively unknown environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to the field of study.

CB8. Capacity to integrate knowledge and tackle the complexity of formulating judgments based on incomplete or limited information, taking due consideration of the social and ethical responsibilities involved in applying knowledge and making judgments.

CB9. Capacity to communicate conclusions, judgments and the grounds on which they have been reached to specialist and non-specialist audiences in a clear and unambiguous manner.

CB10. Skills to enable lifelong self-directed and independent learning.


Specific competences

CE1. Capacity to apply the main concepts and management tools to resolve advanced problems and business situations related to the strategic, financial, commercial, operational and logistics management of international companies.

CE2. Capacity to adopt a strategic, integrated approach to business problems and ability to address them effectively at an international level.

CE9. Capacity to examine the options, potential and opportunities presented by different regions in the global economy and to identify the specific features of the various markets and societies involved, with a view to improving effectiveness and complying with demands on professional responsibility.

 

 

 

 

Learning objectives

 

Referring to knowledge

— Understand East Asian history and economy.

— Understand business structure in East Asia.

— Understand business culture and its importance in East Asia.

— Analyse negotiation protocols in business in East Asian countries.

 

 

Teaching blocks

 

1. East Asian culture and history: an overview

2. East Asian economy: an introduction

3. Business structure in East Asia

4. Understand the culture of East Asia and its importance in the context of doing business

5. Business protocol in East Asia

 

 

Teaching methods and general organization

 

The course combines three different types of learning activities:

— Face-to-face learning activities. These comprise lectures outlining the main concepts and content of the subject, as well as the main tools for analysis. They also include practical classes, which are used to further explore problems and case studies presented by the lecturer.

— Tutored learning activities, primarily comprising the writing of an essay proposed by the lecturer.

— Independent learning activities, which consist of the completion of problem-solving exercises and case studies, and further study of the basic subject material and recommended reading.

The course makes use of the Virtual Campus to facilitate communication between students and teachers, and for the provision and submission of material, such as practical exercises, statistical information, self-assessment tasks, essays, and so on.

The lecturer establishes a schedule of office hours sufficient to manage the subject and resolve any doubts and queries. 

The main teaching methodologies used in class are basically: lectures, group work, problem-solving, information searches and case studies.

 

 

Official assessment of learning outcomes

 

Continuous assessment consists of assessed activities (worth 50% of the final grade) and a final written test (worth 50% of the final grade).

Assessed activities consist of group assignments to be presented in class, related to different business topics, such as sectorial analysis, opportunities for foreign companies in different fields or case studies.

The final exam takes place on the date set by the Academic Committee and covers the entire content. Given the characteristics of the subject, it is not possible to sit the exam if not on the official date. Questions may include the resolution of practical exercises, calculations of economic aggregates and the application of basic concepts of economy, culture and business in East Asia. This exam is worth 50% of the final grade. In any case, students must obtain a minimum mark of 4 out of 10 in this exam, which is comprehensive for all of the subject. Failure to reach a minimum mark of 4 results in the final grade being "Fail", regardless of the results for continuous assessment.


Repeat assessment

Students who fail the subject are eligible to repeat assessment, regardless of the assessment procedure they follow. The repeat assessment examination, which is held on the date set by the Academic Committee, covers the entire course content and is the same for all students. It may include questions based on problem-solving exercises, calculations of economic aggregates, and the application of basic concepts related to economics, culture and business in East Asia.

Note that for repeat assessment the mark obtained in this examination is the final grade for the subject. Therefore, a minimum mark of 5 out of 10 must be obtained to achieve a pass grade.

 

Examination-based assessment

Single assessment consists of a final examination. To pass the course, a minimum pass grade must be obtained in the final examination. Questions may include problem-solving exercises, calculations of economic aggregates, and the application of basic concepts related to economics, culture and business in East Asia.

The final examination takes place on the date set by the Academic Committee and covers the entire course content. Given the characteristics of the subject, it is not possible to sit the examination on a date different from the official date.


Repeat assessment

Students who fail the subject are eligible to repeat assessment, regardless of the assessment procedure they follow. The repeat assessment examination, which is held on the date set by the Academic Committee, covers the entire course content and is the same for all students. It may include questions based on problem-solving exercises, calculations of economic aggregates, and the application of basic concepts related to economics, culture and business in East Asia.

Note that for repeat assessment the mark obtained in this examination is the final grade for the subject. Therefore, a minimum mark of 5 out of 10 must be obtained to achieve a pass grade.

Single assessment or continuous assessment

Students choose the option under which they want to be assessed in the final exam: single assessment or continuous assessment.

 

 

Reading and study resources

Consulteu la disponibilitat a CERCABIB

Book

  • BARTH, James R. CAPRIO Jr, Gerard. PHUMIWASANA, Triphon. The Transformation of China from an Emerging Economy to a Global, Powerhouse, 2009. 

  • BRANDT, Loren et al. China’s Great Transformation, Cambridge: Cambridge university press. 2008. 

  • GOODMAN, Sam. Where East Eats West: The Street-Smarts Guide to Business in China. BookSurge Publishing, Julio de 2009. 

  • OSBURG, John. Anxious Wealth: Money and Morality Among China’s New Rich. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Abril de 2013. 

  • REIN, Shaun. The End of Cheap China: Economic and Cultural Trends that Will Disrupt the World. Wiley, julio de 2014. 

  • Àngels Pelegrín Solé i Amadeu Jensana Tanehashi (2011). Economía de Japón. Barcelona. Editorial UOC. 

  • Laws and regulations on doing business in Japan (2016), JETRO.

https://www.jetro.go.jp/en/invest/setting_up/   Enllaç

  • Domingo Cabeza, Carlos Jiménez, Pelayo Corella (2013). Negociación intercultural. Estrategias y técnicas de negociación internacional. Barcelona, Marge Books. 

Joy Hendry. Understanding Japanese Society, 4th Edition. New York: Routledge, 2013. 

 

 

ADAPTATION OF THE COURSE PLAN TO ONLINE TEACHING MODE FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2019-2020, IN RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 CRISIS

 

Methodology and alternative learning activities:
Each session (class day) has a designated space on the Virtual Campus: a script of the sessions is uploaded which outlines step-by-step the texts and the accompanying exercises, which are proposed through the Task tool.

Exercises are set weekly, correction and feedback are given 24-48 hours after delivery. Group work (up to four students) is permitted to promote teamwork.

Total availability for student queries and permanent contact with the course delegate.

Assessment of learning outcomes:

CONTINOUS ASSESSMENT

Continuous assessment consists of assessed activities (worth 75% of the final grade) and a final written examination uploaded to the Virtual Campus (worth 25% of the final grade).

Assessed activities

1. Comparison of two Book Reviews (uploaded to the Virtual Campus) (worth 30% of the final grade). Miyamoto Musashi: The Book of Five Rings and Sun Tzu: The Art of War.

2. Exercise: Abenomics (uploaded to the Virtual Campus) (worth 30% of the final grade).

3. Short-session assignments (worth 15% of the final grade).

4. Final written examination (17/04/2020) The examination is online and will be uploaded to the Virtual Campus (worth 25% of the final grade).

SINGLE ASSESSMENT

Single final examination (17/4/2020) The examination is online and will be uploaded to the Virtual Campus. To pass the subject, a minimum pass grade must be obtained for the final examination.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT

Students who fail the subject are eligible to repeat assessment, regardless of the assessment procedure they follow. The repeat assessment examination, which is held on the date set by the Academic Committee (4/5/2020), covers the entire course content and is the same for all students. If face-to-face activities remain suspended, the examination will be online and uploaded to the Virtual Campus.

Note that for repeat assessment the mark obtained in this examination is the final grade for the subject. Therefore, a minimum mark of 5 out of 10 must be obtained to achieve a pass grade.

Single assessment or continuous assessment

Students choose the option under which they want to be assessed: single assessment or continuous assessment.

Basic information sources:

McBride, J; Xu, B. (2018). Abenomics and the Japanese Economy. Council on Foreign Relations.

https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/abenomics-and-japanese-economy.

Stiglitz, J. E. (2013). The promise of Abenomics. Project Syndicate.

Yamaguchi K. (2016). Why Japanese-style Employment Systems Hamper the Success of Women. Discuss Japan—Japan Foreign Policy Forum No. 32.

Bradsher, K; Buckley, C. (2019). Facing slowing Economic Growth, China’s premier promises Relief for Business.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/04/business/china-premier-li-keqiangspeech.

Nye, J.S. (2019). Does China Have Feet of Clay?, Project Syndicate.

Maddison, A. (2007). Chinese economic performance in the long run. Development Centre of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. http://piketty.pse.ens.fr/files/Maddison07.pdf