Teaching plan for the course unit

 

 

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General information

 

Course unit name: Economic History

Course unit code: 363657

Academic year: 2021-2022

Coordinator: Ana Carreras Marin

Department: Department of Economic History, Institutions and Policy and World Economy

Credits: 6

Single program: S

 

 

Estimated learning time

Total number of hours 150

 

Face-to-face and/or online activities

60

(With the exception of the GIE group.)

 

-  Lecture with practical component

Face-to-face

 

45

 

-  Group tutorial

Face-to-face

 

15

Supervised project

40

Independent learning

50

 

 

Recommendations

 

The main objective of this subject is to enable students to understand the economics behind the complex and dynamic nature of contemporary society by using the economist’s “toolbox”. The study of economic history requires reasoned selection of the appropriate macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts and analytical tools, which must be skillfully applied outside the abstract framework of pure theory. The intellectual approach required for this subject also proves useful in the courses on applied economics, economic policy, public treasury, international economics, statistics and econometrics.

To fully understand economic history, students must also be aware of the basic historical framework, particularly for contemporary economic developments. Students who have not acquired this knowledge in previous studies should ensure that they have a general understanding by the time the course starts.

 

 

Competences to be gained during study

 

   -

Capacity for learning and responsibility (capacity for analysis and synthesis, to adopt global perspectives and to apply the knowledge acquired/capacity to take decisions and adapt to new situations).

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To be able to interpret the development and changes in an environment.

   -

To relate a market, company or institution to its social, legal or historical context.

   -

To identify the economic agents that make up an economy and to understand how they interrelate so as to take economic decisions with full awareness of their effects.

Learning objectives

 

Referring to knowledge

  • Be able to recognise the principal trends, stages and causes of changes to the international economy over time.
  • Understand the contribution of different currents of historical development to the diversity and complexity of the world today.
  • Understand that growth is a dynamic and historical concept.

 

Referring to abilities, skills

  • Be able to use economic language, reasoning and tools for historical analysis.
  • Apply logical reasoning to deduce the consequences of applying specific economic policies.

 

Referring to attitudes, values and norms

  • Strive to maintain a constant level of effort.
  • Understand the importance of adapting to change in a dynamic world.

 

 

Teaching blocks

 

1. The Great Divergence

1.1. Historical evolution of the international economy and origins of the Great Divergence

1.2. Demographics and demographic regimes during the pre-industrial era: Malthus and the great divergence

1.3. The dynamism of Great Britain and the Netherlands during the Modern era: agriculture, trade and manufacturing

2. The Industrial Revolution, 1780-1850

2.1. Determinants of the Industrial Revolution: institutions, factor endowment and markets

2.2. Technical and organisational change: causes and consequences

2.3. Productivity increases and distribution: the standard of living debate

3. Industrialisation and divergence in the 19th century

3.1. Modern economic growth and industrialisation

3.2. The second industrial revolution and the emergence of new economic powers

3.3. The divergence of the periphery and its causes

4. The first economic globalisation in the 19th century

4.1. Evolution of trade and product-market integration

4.2. The international monetary system and capital markets

4.3. Mass emigration: causes and consequences

4.4. The effects of globalisation and the seeds of its destruction: economic policy, growth of inequality and imperialism

5. War, depression and deglobalisation, 1914-1950

5.1. The First World War and its economic consequences

5.2. The slow path to the abyss: growth inequality in the 1920s

5.3. The causes of the Great Depression and its international repercussions

5.4. Leaving the Great Depression behind

6. The golden age of the world economy, 1950-1973

6.1. The Second World War and economic reconstruction

6.2. Economic growth in the world: factors, policies and models

6.3. Convergence, divergence and inequality during the golden age of the world economy

 

 

Teaching methods and general organization

 

This subject includes directed work in tutorial sessions as teaching methodology. Two types of face-to-face classes are used: lectures with a practical component and group tutorials. Lectures with a practical component consist of presentations of the theoretical and practical content outlined in the course plan and general class discussion. Group tutorials address specific topics covered in class to clarify or expand on the students’ general knowledge of the subject, using different types of material for specific cases (texts, diagrams, tables, examples, etc.). The total study load for face-to-face learning is 60 hours, as indicated in this course plan.

The lectures with a practical component are designed to provide students with the resources they need to achieve the learning and responsibility capacities and to interpret the evolution of an economic context, in line with the UB common- and degree-specific generic competences. Group tutorials are used for practical activities through which students acquire a capacity for analysis and synthesis, to apply their knowledge, to make decisions and to adapt to new situations and changing economic contexts, in line with the UB common- and degree-specific generic competences.

The GIE group (Z1) follows a specific methodology. This group is for students who have already taken this subject. Two hours of tuition are given per week, in early-afternoon sessions.

As a result of the project for blended learning (http://www.ub.edu/rimda/rdm_inici [in Catalan]) that is being implemented in the University of Barcelona, the teaching methodology for the groups participating in the project may differ from that described above. The details of this methodology will be published in the Virtual Campus at the start of the academic year.

 

 

Official assessment of learning outcomes

 

Continuous assessment

The content of the lectures and tutorial sessions are assessed as follows:

1. Concepts covered in the lectures and the course handbook are assessed in a compulsory final examination. A maximum mark of 6 points is awarded (representing 60% of the final grade for the subject). To be eligible to pass the course, students must obtain a mark of 2.5 out of 6 or higher for the final examination. Students who obtain a weighted final grade (for the group tutorials and final examination) of 5.0 but whose examination mark is below 2.5 are not eligible to pass the course and receive a published final grade of 4.0.

2. The tutorial sessions are assessed through a series of individual and group exercises and tests. There are a minimum of three assessed activities during the course. A maximum mark of 2 points is awarded for each exercise or test. The overall mark for these activities is the sum of the two highest marks. It represents 40% of the final grade. Students may under no circumstances repeat an exercise or test.

3. Students who wish to be entered for continuous assessment must attend face-to-face sessions on a regular basis.

4. Lecturers may choose to consider additional activities for assessment, including class work and tasks to be completed outside class hours. A maximum mark of 2 points is awarded for these additional activities. An additional assessment activity can be used to substitute one of the assessed exercises or tests carried out during the tutorial sessions. The marks for additional activities can be used to calculate the overall mark for continuous assessment activities, as outlined in point 2.

5. The assessment process includes activities to evaluate the students’ capacity to acquire knowledge and take responsibility for the learning process, and to interpret and adapt to changing economic contexts, in line with the generic competences established by the UB and this course plan.

6. Repeat assessment evaluates the degree to which the learning objectives have been achieved and is carried out in accordance with the procedure defined by the Faculty of Economics and Business.

7. The same assessment system and criteria outlined in points 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 apply to students enrolled in the group taught in English. However, continuous assessment exercises and tests, both written and spoken, must be completed in English.

8. Students in the GIE group can also request continuous assessment, although in this case the activities are adapted to the specific characteristics of the teaching methodology, as established in the course programme.

 

Examination-based assessment

Students who do not wish to be assessed on a continuous basis during the course can request single assessment. The following conditions apply:

1. A written request must be submitted to the lecturer before the date of the final examination. Students should keep a copy of the submitted request for their reference.

2. Students complete a compulsory final examination. Students must answer all the questions, with a maximum grade of 10.

3. The assessment process is established to evaluate the students’ capacity to acquire knowledge in line with the generic competences established by the UB and stipulated in this course plan.

4. Repeat assessment evaluates the degree to which the learning objectives have been achieved and is carried out in accordance with the procedure defined by the Faculty of Economics and Business.

5. The English-language group will follow the procedure outlined in points 1-4 for single assessment.

6. Students in the GIE group are also subject to the conditions outlined in the previous points with respect to requests for single assessment, the format of the final examination and the repeat assessment process.

NB. As a result of the project for blended learning (http://www.ub.edu/rimda/rdm_inici [in Catalan]) that is being implemented in the University of Barcelona, the teaching methodology for the groups participating in the project may differ from that described above. The details of this methodology will be published in the Virtual Campus at the start of the academic year.

 

 

Reading and study resources

Consulteu la disponibilitat a CERCABIB

Book

ALLEN, Robert C. Global Economic History. Oxford University Press, 2011

Catāleg UB  Enllaç
Catāleg UB. Versiķ en castellā (2013)  Enllaç

FELIU MONTFORT, Gaspà.; SUDRIÀ, Carles. Introducció a la història econòmica mundial. 3a. ed. revisada. València: Publicacions UV : Publicacions UB, 2013

Catāleg UB  Enllaç
Catāleg UB. Versiķ en castellā (2013)  Enllaç

J. PALAFOX, los tiempos cambian. Evolución de la economía, València, Tirant Humanitats, 2014

Catāleg UB.   Enllaç

Zamagni, Vera (2017), An Economic History of Europe since 1700. Agenda Publishing, Págs. 314.

Electronic text

TELLO ARAGAY, Enric, (Coord.). Com hem arribat fins aquí. Una introducció a la història econòmica global. Barcelona, UOC, 2012

Recurs electrōnic extern  Enllaç