Teaching plan for the course unit

 

 

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General information

 

Course unit name: Microcontroller for Biomedical Applications and Systems (MASB)

Course unit code: 366222

Academic year: 2021-2022

Coordinator: Jordi Colomer Farrarons

Department: Department of Electronic and Biomedical Engineering

Credits: 3

Single program: S

 

 

Estimated learning time

Total number of hours 75

 

Face-to-face and/or online activities

30

 

-  Lecture

Face-to-face

 

8

 

-  Laboratory session

Face-to-face

 

22

Independent learning

45

 

 

Competences to be gained during study

 

   -

To use IT tools to search for reference resources or information related to medical technologies and bioengineering (Personal).

   -

To be able to work independently (Personal).

   -

To gain knowledge of basic and technological subjects required to learn new methods and technologies and ensure versatility and the ability to adapt to new situations (Personal).

   -

To be able to take further studies and to develop a positive attitude in order to keep knowledge up-to-date in a process of lifelong learning. To have sufficient depth of knowledge to start postgraduate studies in the field of advanced biomedical engineering.

   -

- Ability to solve problems with initiative, creativity and decision making in accordance with criteria of cost, quality, safety, sustainability, time and taking into account the ethical principles of the profession.

- Knowledge of basic and technological subjects, which enable them to learn new methods and technologies, as well as provide them with a great versatility to adapt to new situations.

- Scientific and technological training for the professional exercise in the design and development of measurement, control and communication systems, in all those biomedical activities that society and scientific knowledge ask for.

- Ability to approach the design of new products in a systemic way. Optimally choose which parts of the application require a hardware or software solution, knowing how to properly integrate both parts into the final product and being able to develop, in this case, the interface that allows integration in more complex architectures.

- Ability to conceive, design and produce equipment and systems, especially devoted to biology and medicine. In particular, integrate information processing algorithms into the appropriate hardware.

 

 

Learning objectives

 

Referring to knowledge

— Identify the different elements that define the basic structure of a microcontroller.

— Recognise and classify, depending on speed and cost, the different types of memory that coexist in a microcontroller.

— Use C / C ++ language at the register level for the programming of microcontrollers.

— Know and apply the functionality of the different types of peripherals that coexist in microcontrollers (clock system, counters, analog-digital converters, general purpose inputs/outputs and interruptions).

 

Referring to abilities, skills

— Program a 32-bit microcontroller at the registration level using professional development and debugging (IDE) environments.

— Program a 32-bit microcontroller using the Arduino interface.

— Design flow diagrams based on the application and requirements of the biomedical device.

— Transfer a flowchart to a programming language for microcontrollers.

— Program following best practices, such as a legible programming style and the use of comments, that facilitate the collaboration in developments in team.

— Create specific application documentation within the scope of software development.

 

 

Teaching blocks

 

1. Introduction to microcontrollers

1.1. Evolution of microcontrollers

1.2. Structure of a microcontroller

1.3. Applications

2. Peripherals and memories

2.1. Type of memories

2.2. Clock system

2.3. General purpose inputs and outputs

2.4. Counters

2.5. Analog-digital converter

2.6. Serial communication

2.7. Interruptions

3. Development of a firmware-based project

3.1. Flowcharts

3.2. Teamwork methodologies

3.3. Programming in C / C ++ and good practices

 

 

Teaching methods and general organization

 

In every equipment, system, or biomedical instrument, there is a unit in charge of the processing and management of the data. At the same time, it is also responsible for offering interfaces to the user (UI) and the different instrumentation modules that may exist. These electronic devices are microcontrollers.

This subject on the programming of microcontrollers for biomedical devices is incorporated into the set of subjects that form the transversal axis of the field of electronics of the degree in Biomedical Engineering and complements the foundations of electronics (Applied Electronics) and instrumentation (Instrumentation and Biomedical Signals) and synchronizes with the optative course Biomedical Equipment and Instruments (364595) to provide a general overview of biomedical instruments and systems. Once completed, students can design and implement a biomedical device in all phases of their development.

Throughout the course, students work on a project to implement portable instrumentation equipment for biomedical applications.

The subject has been designed to follow the flipped classroom methodology. In this way, part of the learning process is carried out outside the classroom, as theoretical foundations are explained through different multimedia resources (text documents, slides, articles, videos, infographics, etc.), and classroom time is used to conduct more complex cognitive processes that foster meaningful learning through lab exercises and projects, live demonstrations, and problem-solving.

The course is mainly taught in English and organized into two macrocycles. In a first macrocycle, students are introduced to the world of microcontrollers and the programming of each of the basic modules of the biomedical device and then move on to their guided and practical implementation in the laboratory. Within this macrocycle, each of the modules/practices corresponds to a microcycle.

In the second macrocycle, students develop a project independently, where they have to program a portable potentiostat using all the knowledge and skills acquired in the first macrocycle.

Despite the health situation arising from the pandemic caused by COVID-19, the coordination of the subject and the teaching staff and university authorities will actively work to maintain teaching and interaction with students in the most effective way circumstances allow. In this sense, the different resources of the university will be used to facilitate learning and meet the course’s objectives. At all times, the main tool for teacher-student communication will be the Virtual Campus of the subject.

If necessary and depending on the number of students enrolled, the capacity of the classroom, and whether it has retransmission systems (streaming), the teaching activities and methodologies will be adapted to the needs, combining face-to-face and online classes/activities in percentages that will be detailed as required by the circumstances.

 

 

Official assessment of learning outcomes

 

Grades 
15% - Practices based on ArduinoTM
15% - Practices based on register-level programming
60% - Final project
10% - Final exam

Repeat assessment

Students may repeat assessments for both the final exam and the final project. Repeat assessment of both activities will take place on the same day. There is no repeat assessment for practical activities.

Considerations

— Attendance to face-to-face and virtual laboratory sessions, both for practical activities and for the project, is compulsory.
— All the assessed elements have to reach a minimum mark of 4 for students to pass the subject.
— Copying or plagiarism (both in the exam and in practical activities or the project) implies not qualifying for this activity. Copying in two or more activities implies failing the course.
— Continuous assessment involves students delivering additional learning-outcome evidence that is not counted in the final assessment grade and which will allow teachers to give feedback with the intention of favouring the acquisition of knowledge and skills that are taught in the subject.

 

Examination-based assessment

Grades
15% - Practices based on ArduinoTM
15% - Practices based on register-level programming
60% - Final project
10% - Final exam

Repeat assessment

Students may repeat assessments for both the final exam and the final project. Repeat assessment of both activities will take place on the same day. There is no repeat assessment for practical activities.

Considerations

— Attendance to face-to-face and virtual laboratory sessions, both for practical activities and for the project, is compulsory.
— All the assessed elements have to reach a minimum mark of 4 for students to pass the subject.
— Copying or plagiarism (both in the exam and in practical activities or the project) implies not qualifying for this activity. Copying in two or more activities implies failing the course.

 

 

Reading and study resources

Consulteu la disponibilitat a CERCABIB

Book

  1. Kernighan, B. W., & Ritchie, D. M. (1988). The C programming language (Vol. 2). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: prentice-Hall.
  2. White, E. (2011). Making Embedded Systems: Design Patterns for Great Software. " O’Reilly Media, Inc.".